Inside the new Photography Centre at the V&A.

The Victoria and Albert Museum, formerly South Kensington Museum, began collecting photographs in the mid-nineteenth century. Today, long after the first photographs entered the collection in 1852, the museum holds over 800,000 of them, and still counting. The newly opened Photography Centre traces the history of photography from its early pioneers until the present day. … Continue reading Inside the new Photography Centre at the V&A.

Gifts that kept on giving and medieval alternative facts. ‘Anglo-Saxon Kingdoms. Art, Word, War’ at the British Library. Exhibition review.

The exhibition at the British Library tells the complex story of the Anglo-Saxons from the early sixth century till the Norman Conquest. Art and books that survived from the period are good sources of information about the life of the Anglo-Saxons, mostly from the perspective of the rich and/or famous, such as princes, kings, nobles … Continue reading Gifts that kept on giving and medieval alternative facts. ‘Anglo-Saxon Kingdoms. Art, Word, War’ at the British Library. Exhibition review.

4 reasons to see Edward Burne-Jones exhibition at Tate Britain, London.

If you are a fan of Burne-Jones already you will need no further encouragement. The first major retrospective in forty years is packed with his most famous paintings, but you will also see drawings, stained glass, tapestries, book illustrations and decorative panels. Edward Burne-Jones (1833-1898) was a member of the Pre-Raphaelite Brotherhood, his early art … Continue reading 4 reasons to see Edward Burne-Jones exhibition at Tate Britain, London.

Crafting stories, weaving pictures. Anni Albers at Tate Modern – exhibition review

Anni Albers (born Annelise Else Frieda Fleischmann, 1899-1994) studied weaving at the Bauhaus, the art school in Weimar known for promoting all arts as equal. There was no such thing as ‘lesser arts’ as far as the school founder Walter Gropius was concerned, however, the weaving classes at the Bauhaus were known as the ‘Women’s … Continue reading Crafting stories, weaving pictures. Anni Albers at Tate Modern – exhibition review

Behjat Sadr at the Mosaic Rooms – discover the art of the pioneering female modernist from Iran.

Behjat Sadr: Dusted Waters is the current exhibition at the Mosaic Rooms, London. It is the first UK retrospective of Behjat Sadr (1924-2009), trailblazing Iranian modernist painter. Although little known today (the exhibition is aiming to change that), Sadr was one of the first female painters of her time to gain international recognition, she exhibited … Continue reading Behjat Sadr at the Mosaic Rooms – discover the art of the pioneering female modernist from Iran.

Eyebrow-raising exhibition at the Saatchi Gallery – ‘Black Mirror: Art As Social Satire’

Currently running at the Saatchi Gallery Black Mirror is bound to raise a few eyebrows for various reasons. Artworks by 26 artists in the spirit of Pop artists and Dadaists address consumerism, fake news and the status of art in contemporary society. Some works will make you smile, others will make you feel puzzled or … Continue reading Eyebrow-raising exhibition at the Saatchi Gallery – ‘Black Mirror: Art As Social Satire’

‘Penumbra: textured shadow, coloured light’ Rashid Khalifa (exhibition review)

Rashid Khalifa’s exhibition does not require lengthy explanations. The title ‘Penumbra: textured shadow, coloured light’ describes the contents very well. Penumbra, or partial shadow is the integral part of the installation. Do not be discouraged by what looks like an assemblage of metal cages at first glance. Do enter and enjoy this visual feast. Look … Continue reading ‘Penumbra: textured shadow, coloured light’ Rashid Khalifa (exhibition review)

Magic Realism: Art in Weimar Germany 1919-1933 (exhibition review)

This year marks the centenary of the end of the First World War and Tate used this opportunity to open another exhibition that is fit for the occasion. (‘Aftermath’, the earlier exhibition at Tate Britain was devoted to artistic responses to WWI in Britain, France and Germany). ‘Magic Realism’ at Tate Modern explores further the … Continue reading Magic Realism: Art in Weimar Germany 1919-1933 (exhibition review)

What’s wrong with St Dorothy’s shoes? (my medieval shoe art show)

On my recent visit to the National Gallery in London I spent some time looking at the medieval collection. In the room with art from Cologne and West Germany I noticed a painting with one slightly odd detail. Saints Peter and Dorothy (1505-10) was painted by the Master of St Bartholomew Altarpiece (Netherlandish painter active … Continue reading What’s wrong with St Dorothy’s shoes? (my medieval shoe art show)

‘Enid Marx: Print, Pattern and Popular Art’ exhibition at the House of Illustration

Enid Marx: Print, Pattern and Popular Art at the House of Illustration celebrates life and work of this inspirational but little known artist, a designer and painter. Enid Marx (1902-1998), also known as ‘Marco’ had a very strong personality and would rarely take no for an answer. She did not shy away from unconventional commissions … Continue reading ‘Enid Marx: Print, Pattern and Popular Art’ exhibition at the House of Illustration